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Available Projects: 48

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Project Commenced

UKWIR Reference
BQ


Read Report/s & Resume/s  

Achieving zero harm from plastics via water industry operations and activities Phase 1

Aim: to develop the research challenges that need to be addressed to tackle the issue of plastics in the terrestrial water cycle. The research challenges will later be used by UKWIR to generate calls, ideally including short (1-2 years), medium (2-3 years) and longer term (3-5 years).
- Preparatory work: providing the sector information required and including input from the water/waste supply chains. Information gathered through this process will inform the delivery of the workshop, the nature of the workshop questions discussed, and the material will later be used by UKWIR in developing the research roadmap.
- Workshop: A facilitated workshop through which to test assumptions, identify and rank research challenges.
- Workshop follow-up: develop outputs and report to UKWIR. Primarily the research challenges.



Project Status
Project Commenced

UKWIR Reference
82


Read Report/s & Resume/s  

Achieving Zero Leakage by 2050: Phase 2: Understanding the balance between customer use, supply pipe leakage and plumbing losses in water delivered to household properties

This project will use recently developed flow estimation techniques to investigate these factors across a representative sample of household properties within several water companies.  

The data obtained will be used to provide greatly improved estimates of: 

  • Plumbing losses, which are part of consumption
  • Water running into storage at night, also part of consumption
  • Background leakage on underground supply pipes, which is part of the total leakage KPI


Project Status
Project Commenced

UKWIR Reference
BQ


Read Report/s & Resume/s  

Achieving zero leakage by 2050: Project 2 - Incidence and causes of repeat bursts at old repairs

The objectives of the project will be:

(i) To assess the proportions of bursts on mains of different materials which occur as a result of the failure of a previous repair, and thereby to determine whether this is a significant problem.

(ii) Where bursts have occurred at the site of a previous repair, to determine where possible whether these have resulted from deterioration of the materials used for the repair over time, or by faulty workmanship at the time of the original repair.

(iii) To provide guidance for maintenance operatives carrying out repairs, on how to minimise the likelihood of future failures



Project Status
Project Commenced

UKWIR Reference
L1192


Read Report/s & Resume/s  

Active Leakage Control efficiency in the SELL calculation Renamed: Active Leakage Control Efficiency

Active Leakage Control (ALC) is defined as the processes by which companies identify, detect, locate and eliminate water losses caused by leaks which are not visible on the ground surface.  Very little work has been done on the efficiency of ALC. It is very unclear how this should be defined or how it can be quantified.  Nor is it clear what levels of efficiency should be achievable within water company operations.

 This project would investigate alternative definitions for ALC efficiency, and alternative parameters for measuring it. It would establish which are the most useful definitions and measures, and then gather data from companies to establish what levels of efficiency should be achievable within water company operations. Finally it would consider the most practical way to incorporate this into SELL calculations, allowing for companies’ future aspirations for ALC efficiency.



Project Status
Project Commenced

UKWIR Reference
WW1226


Read Report/s & Resume/s  

Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR)

  1. The primary aim is to gain an understanding of the effect of various wastewater and bio-solids treatment options on AMR activity.

  2. The secondary aim is to determine what indicator methods and analytical techniques are most appropriate to use to determine the risk from resistant organisms and AMR material in wastewater, bio-solids and in the receiving environments, including river water used for potable water supply. We need to understand if the risk is best described by specific measures (bacteria, ARG) or if there are appropriate indicators that can be used as effective surrogates.

  3. It is also important for the water industry to understand the drivers that promote increased resistance in both our works and in the environment. Is the principal source of AMR in wastewater domestic inputs, or are there alternative/specific AMR sources and, if so, can we better target AMR reduction at source? Are the concentrations of antibiotic residues, and other contaminants such as heavy metals, typically found in sewage effluent and biosolids sufficient to exacerbate the spread of resistance? What is the relevance of the differing types of receiving environment into which wastewater effluent is released in terms of potential risk?